Science & Technology

Intel Museum

intel-museum
Intel Museum
The Intel Museum located at Intel’s headquarters in Santa Clara, California, has exhibits of Intel’s products and history as well as semiconductor technology in general. The museum is open weekdays and Saturdays except holidays. It is open to the public with free admission. The museum was started in the early 1980s as an internal project at Intel to record its history. It opened to the public in 1992, later being expanded in 1999 to triple its size and add a store. It has exhibits about how semiconductor chip technology works, both as self-paced exhibits and by reservation as grade-school educational programs.

A fully functional 130x scale replica of the Intel 4004 CPU was built using discrete transistors and put on display in 2006.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Museum


Lick Observatory

1024px-Lick_Observatory_Refractor
Lick Observatory’s Great Lick 91-centimeter (36-inch) telescope housed in the South (large) Dome of main building
The Lick Observatory is an astronomical observatory, owned and operated by the University of California. It is situated on the summit of Mount Hamilton, in the Diablo Range just east of San Jose, California, USA. The observatory is managed by the University of California Observatories, with headquarters on the University of California, Santa Cruz, campus, where its scientific staff moved in the mid-1960s.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lick_Observatory


NASA Ames Research Center

1280px-NASA_Ames_Visitor_Center
NASA Ames Exploration Center
Ames Research Center (ARC), commonly known as NASA Ames, is a major NASA research center at Moffett Federal Airfield in California’s Silicon Valley. Originally founded as the second National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) laboratory, that agency was dissolved and its assets and personnel transferred to the newly created National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on October 1, 1958. NASA Ames is named in honor of Joseph Sweetman Ames, a physicist and one of the founding members of NACA. At last estimate NASA Ames has over US$3.0 billion in capital equipment, 2,300 research personnel and a US$860 million annual budget.

Ames was originally founded to conduct wind-tunnel research on the aerodynamics of propeller-driven aircraft; however, its role has expanded to encompass spaceflight and information technology. Ames plays a role in many NASA missions. It provides leadership in astrobiology; small satellites; robotic lunar exploration; the search for habitable planets; supercomputing; intelligent/adaptive systems; advanced thermal protection; and airborne astronomy. Ames also develops tools for a safer, more efficient national airspace. The center’s current director is Eugene Tu.

The site is mission center for several key current missions (Kepler, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) and a major contributor to the “new exploration focus” as a participant in the Orion crew exploration vehicle.


The Tech Museum of Innovation

The_Tech_Museum_of_Innovation_in_Downtown_San_Jose

The Tech Museum of Innovation

Planning began in 1978 by members of the Junior League of Palo Alto and later assistance by the San Jose Junior League. The first 20,000-square-foot (1,900 m2) temporary exhibit finally opened in 1990 “The Garage” as it was named, opened in San Jose’s former convention center. On October 31, 1998, it opened a brand-new 132,000-square-foot (12,300 m2) facility, and has had 4,000,000 visitors.[3]

The museum is composed of three floors, each with its own significance. The ground floor has the main entrance, a gift shop and cafe, the Imax theater, and a recreational area that is reserved for special events. The Tech Museum’s architecture is the work of Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta.[4]

Four major theme galleries fill the upper level and lower level of the museum: Communication, Exploration, Innovation and Life Tech. These galleries are constantly being revamped and changed to fit the theme movies and exhibits. On the lower level there is also a public piece of artwork titled Origin, which is inside a 45-foot-tall (14 m) cylinder.[5]

The Tech Museum reflects its social context, capturing Silicon Valley’s celebration of technology with a fascination with what the museum’s literature refers to as the “gizmos and gadgets” produced by Valley companies. Early reviews, however, criticized The Tech for failing to provide a coherent direction or message.

Image By The Tech Museum of Innovation – available online, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31028762


Children's_Discovery_Museum_of_San_Jose

Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose
Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose (CDM) is located on Woz Way in downtown San Jose, California. Woz Way is named after Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple Computer, whose nickname is “Woz,” and who was the single largest private donor during the original capital campaign that funded the museum.

Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose has been ranked by Child Magazine as one of the top 10 children’s museums in the United States[2] and ranked by the London Observer as one of the top 5 science centers in the world.

The museum opened its doors in 1990, and over 6 million visitors have attended. The museum builds and displays interactive exhibits that they believe respond to children’s diverse educational needs. The 52,000-square-foot (4,800 m2) purple building was designed by Mexico City-based architect Ricardo Legorreta.

The museum’s signature programs such as BioSITE and Discovery Youth encompass the broad themes of community, connections and creativity. These programs are intended to provide facilitated, focused, and sustained learning. The museum’s goal is to create interactive exhibits that invite self-directed, open-ended explorations.

In a redevelopment plan released in November 2008, the city of San José has stated its intentions to put forth five million dollars in funds, which will allow the museum to expand by 2013. Plans are to add a new baby mammoth exhibit